Behind Cyanobacteria’s Geometric Patterns

 Seagriculture EU 2024

A team from the UK’s Nottingham Trent University and Loughborough University has revealed the physical mechanism behind the geometric patterns formed by cyanobacteria, one of the oldest and most abundant forms of life on Earth, and which has played a pivotal role in the evolution of our planet.

The team says the findings pave the way to inspiring future investigation of how different types of bacteria self-organize to form structures.

This could improve our understanding of how bacterial biofilms — collections of bacteria that have attached to a surface and each other — are formed. This knowledge is critical given their central role in various processes, such as human infections, environmental degradation, and bioengineering.

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