New Alginate-based Bioinks Developed with High Print Resolution

Seagriculture EU 2024
bioinks

Photocrosslinkable natural carbohydrate alginate-based 3D-printed bioink

A South Korean research team at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) have developed a bioink characterized by enhanced cell viability and printing resolution. This was achieved using alginate derived from algae, a natural carbohydrate, and a harmless visible light.

Professor Hyung Joon Cha from the Department of Chemical Engineering and the School of Convergence Science and Technology led the team, which included PhD candidate Sangmin Lee, and Dr. Geunho Choi from the Department of Chemical Engineering. Their research findings were published in Carbohydrate Polymers, an international journal in the field of biomaterials.

3D bioprinting is a methodology employed in the fabrication of artificial organs or tissues using bioinks, which contain cells. This technique holds significant promise in the realms of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, while also attracting considerable attention within the foodtech sector. This is due to its potential to produce cultivated meat, an emerging concept in future food production. Nevertheless, currently available bioinks exhibit limitations, impeding cell mobility and resulting in low cell viability and printing resolution.

To address these challenges, the research team devised a microgel utilizing a photocrosslinkable alginate. Then, they developed a 3D-printed bioink capable of facilitating free cell movement and proliferation by using this photocrosslinkable alginate microgel. This microgel bioink loaded with cells led to a 4-times increase in cell proliferation compared to conventional bioinks. Furthermore, the microgel demonstrated reduced viscosity when subjected to external forces over a specified period, promptly recovering its initial shape even after deformation. These characteristics significantly increased the resolution and lamination capacity of the printing outcomes.

“We engineered functional tissue structures by employing a biomaterial-based bioink with exceptional and stable cell-loading capabilities for practical 3D printing,” said Professor Cha. “Future research and refinement of this technology are expected to propel its widespread adoption in the engineering of artificial organs and the production of cultivated meat.”

This research was sponsored by the Creative Innovation Program of POSCO Holdings and the Value-added Foodtech Development Program of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint articles in their entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact david@algaeplanet.com. Algae Planet accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

Seagriculture USA 2024
AlgaeMetrics
Contact Phil Ganz

Subscribe

Breaking-News

  • June 19, 2024: Scottish Sea Farms has joined a seaweed growing venture in a project that combines salmon and kelp farming on Loch Spelve in the Sound of Mull. The intention of the year-long pilot is to enrich and replenish the marine environment while minimizing any impact from farming activities. READ MORE...
  • June 17, 2024: The ALEHOOP project, funded by the Circular Bio-based Europe Joint Undertaking, has successfully demonstrated the feasibility of sustainable plant-based protein extraction. The project has developed pilot-scale biorefineries that recover low-cost dietary proteins from algae and plant-based biomass. READ MORE...
  • June 14, 2024: Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed microscopic robots, known as microrobots, capable of swimming through the lungs to deliver cancer-fighting medication directly to metastatic tumors. This approach has shown promise in mice, where it inhibited the growth and spread of tumors that had metastasized to the lungs, thereby boosting survival rates compared to control treatments. READ MORE...
  • June 12, 2024: The PROTEUS consortium of 11 international partners, funded by the Circular Bio-Based Europe Joint Undertaking, intends to establish the first industrial-scale biorefinery for brown seaweeds. This facility will enhance sustainable production of bio-based ingredients from Laminaria hyperborea, an untapped European renewable resource, meeting global demand in food, feed, personal care, and industrial sectors. READ MORE...

Algae Europe 2024

A Beginner’s Guide